Genesis 1:1, again, and my “Un-Christian” analysis

I stumbled across an amazing blog post today. In it, I and my teachers and the institutions at which I studied are subjected to ad hominem attack. I’ve put the link at the bottom.

In all my posts here on Gen 1:1 (here, here, and here), I have never taken a stand on the evolution vs. creation-science debate, largely because I think the whole thing is a waste of time. If a person’s view of the authority [add: of the Bible, and so God] rests on reading Genesis scientifically and so his or her faith crashes against the wall of science, the teachers and preachers that taught that poor person in the first place will answer to God for misleading others. But that’s their problem and God’s concern; mine is Hebrew grammar and the ancient setting of biblical literature.

So far the readers that have come by this blog and read my posts have understood (I think) that my concern is to explain the legitimate and likely analyses of the various Hebrew grammatical issues that I discuss. This seminary student had the chutzpah (!) to accept the cogency of my arguments on Gen 1:1, and that’s what put me on the radar of the laughably titled group, Answers in Genesis (I don’t see many real answers on that site). I say, if my answers for Genesis get in the way of your theology, you have two choices for response: ignore my argument (and stick your head in the sand) or find a way to nuance your theology. Guess which option the Answers in Genesis folks take?

“How arrogant!”, you say? Oh, so be it. I’ve stared at a lot of Hebrew grammatical problems and my faith hasn’t been shaken. I figure if the text and ideas God’s people left us is shown to be better read as ancient myth than anachronistic science lessons (that fly in the face of modern science, which implies that God is now duping even many Christians who are scientists), then we owe it to them and God to face up to it. We have to remember that even theology (of every kind) is a human creation. In the end, when the curtain is pulled aside, I’m betting that even the best theology will be a bit off. I will say, though, that removing the absurd creation-science vs. evolution debate from my theological horizon was a relieving by-product of my family’s move into the Catholic Church last year. Wow — a context that treats science with the appropriate respect and yet maintains perspective (and the long view) on loci of authority.

In any case, I will proceed with my liberal (ha!) Christian (Wheaton) and secular (UW-Madison) educations (where this Mortenson fellow got “Jewish” in my educational background, I’m not sure — I guess it was the year I spent at Hebrew U in Jerusalem) and my secular job (Univ of Toronto) and risk being called “arrogant” and “un-orthodox” and not getting the Answers in Genesis types to “bow a knee” to me. I’m not losing sleep over any of that.

I note with some humor but no surprise that this Terry Mortenson from Answers in Genesis did not (and almost certainly can not!) engage my grammatical arguments. Instead, my arguments are just un-orthodox, un-historical, and probably un-Christian stuff to ignore. (And no, I have absolutely no interest in reading young-earth creationist literature-carefully or not!)

Go here to find the source of my day’s laugh, the Answers in Genesis blog post by Georgia Purdom.

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2 Responses to “Genesis 1:1, again, and my “Un-Christian” analysis”

  1. A Hebrew Grammarian’s Real Answers in Genesis Says:

    […] Robert Holmstedt normally blogs about Hebrew grammar. But the nonsense Answers in Genesis spouts about the Bible and not just science has irked him enough to comment. Here’s a taste of what he wrote in a recent blog post: […]

  2. kennethos Says:

    What I’d love to do is actually engage Drs. Purdom or Mortenson on their turf (so they don’t feel as threatened) and ask them a few questions, given that they undoubtedly earned their PhD’s academically. I’d love to inquire into that journey and process, and compare it to “proper” exegesis of the text grammatically, in the Hebrew (as opposed to English Bible). They wouldn’t like it, but it’s necessary. Whether or not we’d actually be allowed to do it… is perhaps another story.


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